Choosing a Sport That is Right For You

Sunday, November 4, 2012
The number one thing in my opinion to think about whether you are playing the right sport or not is how much fun you are having at the sport. To be perfectly honest there are other factors such as costs and injuries to consider. These are hard economic times right now in the eyes of many. So, for example, if a child's parent losses their job, the child might not have the proper health care in case of injury on the football field.

Obviously everyone has skill limitations. If a child is unable to maintain the dribbling of a basketball without double dribbling this can grow frustrating for a child who is trying to play basketball. This is particularly true in a league where the referees are trying to teach the kids the rules of the game and thus have to call a lot of double dribbling and traveling violations. If your child gets frustrated by playing something with too many rules, maybe they can consider being a baseball umpire or a basketball referee instead. Therefore they are the one who enforce the rules.


There is the fact that some kids simply get winded quickly. This sort of thing truly limits their options in sports whether it be anything from soccer to most track and field events. If this is the case, there are medical steps that can be taken to ensure your child is able to play the sport of their choice. It is true that even kids with asthma are able to play most sports with great success as long as they are properly monitored.

Sometimes a child will get discouraged and begin to believe they do not have the natural talent to play a sport when the problem is much simpler than that. Going back to the soccer example, a child may not be good at kicking the ball straight towards the goal so they may not be successful as a forward in the game of soccer. However they may be good at stopping the ball from advancing once it gets near them. This means they may be better suited as a defender and their problems could be solved by a simple change of position.

There is the common problem of the skill set simply not completely correlating with a sport. A kid may have the ability to rebound and jump high, but if they don't have at least functional offensive skills maybe basketball isn't the sport for them. Perhaps they could use that jumping ability for volleyball where jumping to the apex can be so beneficial in the spiking process. A parent has to watch their child closely and make gentle suggestions for their child to pick a sport that both excites the child and matches their skill set. If they don't see their kid bringing the needed dedication to a particular sport maybe they need to try something else.
Also you've got to show kids how to use proper time management when selecting a sport. You don't want them to continue practicing at a sport particularly if it is not going to lead to anything. As a parent, you certainly don't want to see them neglecting their homework, because that job as an engineer is more beneficial to society in many ways as being a first draft NHL pick, no matter how big that signing bonus may be.